Sweet Tooth by Ian McEwan review

sweet tooth

I’m a big fan of Ian McEwan and have loved most of his novels, especially his darker ones. Both The Cement Garden and The Comfort of Strangers stayed with me long after I read them and I loved the strong plot line of Atonement, although I was thrown by the way McEwan played with the reader at the end.

Some of McEwan’s plots are better than others and this for me is one of his weaker ones. I was unconvinced by his first-person female narrator, Serena Froome. McEwan keeps reminding us that she is beautiful and several men fall at her feet, yet for the reader she remains elusive. There is very little depth to her character and she simply comes across as frivolous and pasty. I also had to keep reminding myself that I was reading the words of a female narrator. This isn’t usually an issue for me and again I think it’s because Serena’s character is underdeveloped.

Sweet Tooth is set during the Cold War period of the early 1970s. Miss Froome is recruited to MI5, having been groomed by a former lover who brutally rejected her. She soon falls for her MI5 handler, Max, only to be rejected by him too. Then, she is handed an interesting case to work on: Operation Sweet Tooth. Her objective is to recruit up and coming writer Tom Haly on behalf of a fictional arts foundation. The foundation will supplement Haly’s salary so that he can focus on his anti-communist writing, which MI5 is keen to promote. Continue reading

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